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MLA Quiz Answers

  1. According to MLA format, the list of references which appear at the end of your paper is called
    1. is correct; all others are incorrect.
  2. The references at the end of your paper should appear
    1. is correct; all others are incorrect.

Using Parenthetical Citations Correctly

  1. Identify the correct parenthetical citation for this source:
    Tannen, Deborah. The Argument Culture. Toronto: Random House, 1998.
    1. Correct.
    2. Incorrect. The author has not been identified.
    3. Incorrect. The author has not been identified, and the book needs to be identified only if the writer is referring to more than work by Tannen in this paper.
    4. Incorrect. This follows APA format.
    5. Incorrect. MLA does not use a comma after the author or “p.” before page numbers.
  2. Identify the correct parenthetical citation for this source:
    Keaveney, Susan. “When MTV Goes CEO.” Acting on Words. Ed. David Brundage and Michael Lahey. Toronto: Pearson, 2004. 99-103.
    1. Incorrect. This citation follows APA format.
    2. Incorrect. The author does not need to be named again, and there should be no comma between the author and page number.
    3. Incorrect. The editors’ names should not appear here.
    4. Correct. The author has already been identified in the sentence.
    5. Incorrect. The author’s full name and the title should not appear here.
  3. “Melanoma: low-dose chemobiotherapy is effective in treatment of metastatic melanoma.”Medical Devices & Surgical Technology Week 19 Feb. 2006: 372.
    R. W. Weber’s work and a quotation from him are referred to in the above article, but the material has been taken from another source. Which of the following parenthetical citations is correct?
    1. Incorrect. The name of the journal does not need to be included.
    2. Incorrect. This citation makes it look like Weber may have written the article.
    3. Correct. There is no author for the article so a short title is used, and because Weber is quoted within it and is not the author of the article, “qtd. in” must be added to the citation.
    4. Incorrect. This citation follows APA format.
    5. Incorrect. The reader will not be able to identify the source by the page number alone and will assume Weber is the author, and there will be no corresponding entry in the Works Cited.
  4. Identify the correct parenthetical citation for this source:
    Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin. The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures. London: Routledge, 1989.
    1. Incorrect. Use “et al.” only when there are more than three authors.
    2. Correct.
    3. Incorrect. Ampersands are used in APA format.
    4. Incorrect. The book rather than the authors has been identified.
    5. Incorrect. MLA does not use “p.” before a page number.
  5. You have interviewed Shaun White, who won an Olympic gold medal in snowboarding at Turin. You interviewed him in person on Feb. 20, 2006. Which citation is correct?
    1. Incorrect. This follows APA format.
    2. Incorrect. White has already been identified, and MLA format does not require a date.
    3. Correct. There is no parenthetical reference because your Works Cited would refer to White and the rest of the reference.
    4. Incorrect. Personal interviews are referred to by the surname of the person interviewed.
    5. Incorrect. Personal interviews are referred to by the surname of the person interviewed.
  6. You are using material from a newspaper article. There is no author given, but the title of the article is “Was Emerson lying to his constituents?,” published in the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 14, 2006, on p. A2. Which is the proper parenthetical citation for this paraphrase?
    1. Incorrect. “Anonymous” is not used to identify an author in MLA format.
    2. Incorrect. This citation would not match the first word(s) to appear for the reference on the Works Cited list.
    3. Incorrect. Parenthetical citations are required for both quotations and paraphrases.
    4. Incorrect. Emerson did not write the article.
    5. Correct.

Integrating Quotations Correctly

  1. In which sentence has the quotation been integrated the most successfully?
    1. Incorrect. The quotation has not been integrated at all.
    2. Incorrect. There are not enough words in the sentence to integrate the quotation successfully.
    3. Incorrect. The quotation does not fully explain or support the sentence.
    4. Correct. The quotation has been prepared for and fits smoothly into the text.
  2. In which sentence has the quotation been integrated the most successfully?
    1. Incorrect. The breakup of the quotation is awkward and confusing, so it does not fit into the sentence smoothly.
    2. Incorrect. The quotation needs to be introduced from the beginning so there is not a change of voice.
    3. Incorrect. There are not enough words to introduce the quotation smoothly into the text of the sentence.
    4. Correct. The quotation fits smoothly into the text of the sentence.

Using Quotations Correctly

  1. The original quotation reads “The machinists use various tools, such as hammers and tongs, on a daily basis” (Brown 311). Which sentence has used the quotation correctly to fit into it grammatically and logically?
    1. Correct. The verb in the quotation has been made to fit into the sentence grammatically and the words left out do not change the sentence’s meaning.
    2. Incorrect. The original verb tense does not agree with the writer’s sentence.
    3. Incorrect. When words are left out of the beginning of a sentence, they are not replaced by ellipses.
    4. Incorrect. There is no reason to capitalize “machinists.” The latest MLA guide does not include the use of square (editorial) brackets around ellipses.
  2. Which example of a block quotation is correct?
    1. Incorrect. A colon must be preceded by an independent clause even when introducing a quotation.
    2. Correct. Note that “A” has been changed to lower case to fit into the sentence.
    3. Incorrect. Block quotations are not enclosed in quotation marks.
    4. Incorrect. There are four errors here: the use of the colon, the quotation marks, the capital A beginning the quotation, and the placement of the period after the parenthetical citation.

Using Source Materials Fairly

  1. The original quotation from Bob Simpson on a website reads “Although some people believe the Lamborgotti Fasterossa is the fastest car in the world, others name the Ferrari as the fastest.” Which is an unfair and misleading use of this quotation?
    1. Incorrect. This is fair use.
    2. Incorrect. This is fair use.
    3. Correct. Simpson does not claim that the Lamborgotti Fasterossa is the fastest car.
    4. Incorrect. This is fair use.
  2. The original quotation from Jeremy Black, a film critic, reads “This film can be said to be many things, but one of the things it is not is funny.” Which is fair use of this quotation?
    1. Correct.
    2. Incorrect. Black thinks it is many things, but funny isn’t one of them.
    3. Incorrect. This is the opposite of what Black actually claims.
    4. Incorrect. The last part of the sentence reverses what Black has said.

Paraphrasing Correctly

  1. The original quotation follows statistics on the increase in eighteen to thirty-four year olds owning their own businesses: “The trend may dilute corporate pools of promotable junior managers but provide a needed infrastructure for corporate outsourcing” (Keaveney 102-103). Which paraphrase is acceptable?
    1. Incorrect. The syntax follows the original too closely.
    2. Incorrect. Parts of the paraphrase are direct quotations (which are not identified).
    3. Correct.
    4. Incorrect. This paraphrase is not identical in meaning to the original.
  2. The original quotation discussing melanoma treatment reports that “[t]hirty-one patients with histologically confirmed unresectable measurable metastatic melanoma were enrolled [in this] study” (“Melanoma” 372). Which paraphrase is done correctly and best for a lay audience (one unfamiliar with the medical terminology)?
    1. Incorrect. This paraphrase follows the syntax of the original too closely.
    2. Correct. This is a useful, simple paraphrase.
    3. Incorrect. The paraphrase is misleading because there are no conditions attached to the melanoma participants have.
    4. Incorrect. This is not directed to a lay audience who may be unfamiliar with some terms.

Formatting Works Cited Entries Correctly

  1. Which is the correct reference format for this article: The biological, social and clinical bases of drug addiction: commentary and debate by J. Altman, B. J. Everitt, T. W. Robbins, S. Glautier, A. Markou, D. Nutt, R. Oretti and G. D. Phillips. It was published in 1996 in Psychopharmacology, an online journal; ISSN 0033-3158, and Volume 125, Issue Number 4, pages 285 – 345.
    1. Incorrect. The entry must begin with authors; the order is wrong after the journal title, and there is unnecessary information.
    2. Incorrect. There is extra unnecessary information.
    3. Incorrect. There are errors in the reference to authors and placement of year, as well as unnecessary information.
    4. Incorrect. There is extra unnecessary information.
    5. Correct. In MLA, if there are more than three authors, only the first one is named.
  2. The book is called The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures by Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin. It was published in 1989 by Routledge in London. How should it appear as a reference at the end of your paper?
    1. Incorrect. There are only three authors, so they should all be named.
    2. Correct.
    3. Incorrect. The year is in the wrong place.
    4. Incorrect. The authors’ first names are included in MLA (and reversed only after the first name).
    5. Incorrect. The authors’ names should not be reversed after the first one.
  3. The website is called William Faulkner on the Web, and the page you cited is called Faulkner Filmography. The site’s author, John B. Padgett, last modified the page on Monday, October 09, 2000 at 11:56 AM. The URL is http://www.mcsr.olemiss.edu/~egjbp/faulkner/films.html. Pretend that you accessed it on March 5, 2006. Which is the proper reference as it should appear on your Works Cited page?
    1. Incorrect. The information is not all in the correct order, and some parts follow APA format.
    2. Incorrect. Some important information is missing, and some unnecessary information has been included.
    3. Correct. The page cited is part of a larger site by the same author.
    4. Incorrect. The page that the writer is citing is not named.
    5. Incorrect. Part of the citation follows APA format.
  4. You interviewed Pat Sweeney, a cardiologist, for your paper, on Jan. 10, 2006 at 2 p.m. in the doctor’s home. How should your reference read?
    1. Incorrect. This reference does not follow the correct format for the last half of the citation, including the date. You should not include a professional designation.
    2. Incorrect. This follows APA format.
    3. Correct.
    4. Incorrect. The wording is not correct, and there is unnecessary information given.
    5. Incorrect. The wording and order is wrong; unnecessary information is included.
  5. You want to use a newspaper article where there is no author given. The title of the article is “Was Emerson lying to his constituents?” and it was published in the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 14, 2006, on p. A2. Which is the proper reference for the Works Cited?
    1. Incorrect. “Anonymous” is no longer used when creating references where there is no author identified. The format is also incorrect after the newspaper title.
    2. Incorrect. We do not know that the editors are responsible for creating the article, and the order of the date and inclusion of “p.” is incorrect.
    3. Correct.
    4. Incorrect. MLA does not use “p.” for page numbers.
    5. Incorrect. The title for the newspaper is in the wrong order, and the exact date of the article is not given.

Using Punctuation Correctly in Documentation

  1. According to Dr. Nick Riviera, “There is no such thing as an unnecessary operation” (qtd. in Doctor Knows Best 55).
  2. One doctor claims that “[h]anding patients helpful brochures after announcing a diagnosis reflects a caring attitude” (Hibbard 23).
  3. Doctor Knows Best: Quotations from Famous Physicians. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 2005.
  4. Hibbard, Julius. “How to show your patients you care.” Annals of the Royal Society of Physicians and Surgeons 211.4 (Nov. 2004): 23-35.
  5. Munroe, Marvin. Patient Care. 12 Aug. 2004. 10 Mar. 2006 <http://www.marvinmunroe.
    com/patientcare.htm>.

Updated September 10 2014 by Student & Academic Services

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